Holidays first for the older generation? Why not?

27 January 2021 By Paul Martin

  [And by the way, our daughters and their families say they will not be jealous.]

I find all this angst that we may upset the people who’ve not yet been vaccinated [twice] quite pathetic — and also misplaced and wrong.  One columnist, in The Telegraph, wrote his mea culpa for even thinking about a nice vacation, headlined: ‘Young people have paid a heavy price for lockdown. ‘Immunity passports will stoke the fires of inter-generational rage.’ 

 

 

There are several reasons why we deserve to go on holiday long before they do.

Firstly, the older you are, the bigger proportion of your remaining life has been consumed by this year-long restriction on our travel.  Someone who’s say thirty has maybe fifty years to go; someone who is say 66, like me, only has, on average, twenty four more years, according to official figures … The younger the generation, the longer they have to – our grandchildren may on average live to be a hundred.  So proportionately our year has taken a bigger chunk out of our normal lives.

Secondly, as the vaccines kick in, the very hardpressed travel industry needs these people, to fork out cash for their bookings, and to spend wherever they are.  That in turn means the venues and means of travel will still exist when the younger generations can travel. 

And in fact, as the urge to travel will be substantial, the planes or trains will be that much less crowded, so being healthier for all in terms of social distancing.

Thirdly, when travelling, older generations provide less risk to the people in the places to which they travel. I don’t have stats on this, but I bet that per day let’s say an older couple have less contact with others inside two metres away, than the more careless youngsters. Okay, I mean: on average.  So they will be less likely to pick up Covid or a nasty variant and bring it back to the UK.

And finally, the older holiday-makers will often be going to different venues to where they younger ones gravitate, so spreading he recovery.

And the same may apply when the rest of the world has vaccinated the older people in their countries, they can come to visit us, andhelp revive our tourism and travel industries too.

So quit moaning, you spoilsports.

I can hardly wait to wave and say ‘Hasta la vista’ to the envious younger generation, as my wife and I swan off on holiday. Let them envy us if they are so inclined.  [And by the way, our daughters and their families say they will not be jealous.]

I find all this angst that we may upset the people who’ve not yet been vaccinated [twice] quite pathetic — and also misplaced and wrong.  One columnist, in The Telegraph, wrote his mea cupla for even thinking about a nice vacation, headlined: ‘Young people have paid a heavy price for lockdown. ‘Immunity passports will stoke the fires of inter-generational rage.’  He even opined it could aggravate ‘social instability’

 

Nonsense.

 

There are several reasons why we deserve to go on holiday long before they do.

Firstly, the older you are, the bigger proportion of your remaining life has been consumed by this year-long restriction on our travel.  Someone who’s say thirty has maybe fifty years to go; someone who is say 66, like me, only has, on average, twenty four more years, according to official figures … The younger the generation, the longer they have to – our grandchildren may on average live to be a hundred.  So proportionately our year has taken a bigger chunk out of our normal lives.

Secondly, as the vaccines kick in, the very hardpressed travel industry needs these people, to fork out cash for their bookings, and to spend wherever they are.  That in turn means the venues and means of travel will still exist when the younger generations can travel. 

And in fact, as the urge to travel will be substantial, the planes or trains will be that much less crowded, so being healthier for all in terms of social distancing.

Thirdly, when travelling, older generations provide less risk to the people in the places to which they travel. I don’t have stats on this, but I bet that per day let’s say an older couple have less contact with others inside two metres away, than the more careless youngsters. Okay, I mean: on average.  So they will be less likely to pick up Covid or a nasty variant and bring it back to the UK.

And finally, the older holiday-makers will often be going to different venues to where they younger ones gravitate, so spreading he recovery.

And the same may apply when the rest of the world has vaccinated the older people in their countries, they can come to visit us, and help revive our tourism and travel industries too.

So quit moaning, you spoilsports.

He even opined it could aggravate ‘social instability’

 

Nonsense.

 

There are several reasons why we deserve to go on holiday long before they do.

Firstly, the older you are, the bigger proportion of your remaining life has been consumed by this year-long restriction on our travel.  Someone who’s say thirty has maybe fifty years to go; someone who is say 66, like me, only has, on average, twenty four more years, according to official figures … The younger the generation, the longer they have to – our grandchildren may on average live to be a hundred.  So proportionately our year has taken a bigger chunk out of our normal lives.

Secondly, as the vaccines kick in, the very hardpressed travel industry needs these people, to fork out cash for their bookings, and to spend wherever they are.  That in turn means the venues and means of travel will still exist when the younger generations can travel. 

And in fact, as the urge to travel will be substantial, the planes or trains will be that much less crowded, so being healthier for all in terms of social distancing.

Thirdly, when travelling, older generations provide less risk to the people in the places to which they travel. I don’t have stats on this, but I bet that per day let’s say an older couple have less contact with others inside two metres away, than the more careless youngsters. Okay, I mean: on average.  So they will be less likely to pick up Covid or a nasty variant and bring it back to the UK.

And finally, the older holiday-makers will often be going to different venues to where they younger ones gravitate, so spreading he recovery.

And the same may apply when the rest of the world has vaccinated the older people in their countries, they can come to visit us, andhelp revive our tourism and travel industries too.

So quit moaning, you spoilsports.

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